Journals

Scientific Journals Introduction

In academic publishing, a scientific journal is a periodical publication intended to further the progress of science, usually by reporting new research. Journals contain articles that have been peer reviewed in an attempt to ensure that articles meet the journal's standards of quality and scientific validity. If they are describing experiments or calculations, they must supply enough details that an independent researcher could repeat the experiment or calculation to verify the results. Each such journal article becomes part of the permanent scientific record.

Articles tend to be highly technical, representing the latest theoretical research and experimental results in the field of science covered by the journal. They are often incomprehensible to anyone except for researchers in the field and advanced students. Usually, rigorous rules of scientific writing are enforced by the editors; however, these rules may vary from journal to journal, especially between journals from different publishers. Articles are usually either original articles reporting completely new results or reviews of current literature.

Brief journal descriptions can be accessed alphabetically via the menu above or by categories listed alphabetically below. A category is the primary subject matter covered in each news article. The journal, which is usually referenced in the article, contains the primary source material for it.

Categories of Medical Conditions and Associated Journals

Beneficial Foods

Mental Illness

Jama
Translational Psychiatry

Anxiety Disorder

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Social Anxiety Disorder

Mood Disorder

  • Bipolar Disorder

Translational Psychiatry

  • Depressive Disorder

Brain
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Personality, Behavioural and Emotional Disorders

  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Borderline Personality Disorder

Psychotic Disorders

Translational Psychiatry

  • Schizophrenia

Brain
eLife
Journal of Cell Biology
Translational Psychiatry

Neurological Disorder

Developmental Cell
Nature Communications

Dysautonomia

Dystonia

Epilepsy

Brain
eLife

  • Dravet Syndrome

Brain

  • Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

Intellectual and Neurodevelopmental Disorder

eLife

  • 1p36 Deletion Syndrome
  • 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome
  • Allan Herndon Dudley Syndrome
  • Angelman Syndrome
  • Autism

Nature Communications

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder

Academic Pediatrics
eLife
Nature Communications
PLOS ONE
Translational Psychiatry

  • Down Syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
  • Fragile X Syndrome

Brain
Nature Communications

  • Jacobsen Syndrome

Nature Communications

  • Kabuki Syndrome
  • MECP2 Duplication Syndrome
  • Prader Willi Syndrome
  • Rett Syndrome

eLife
Nature Communications

  • Sporadic Intellectual Disability
  • Williams Syndrome
  • X Linked Intellectual Disability

Nervous System Injury

  • Aneurysm
  • Cerebral Palsy

JAMA

  • Spinal Cord Injury

Brain
eLife

  • Stroke

Brain
Science Translational Medicine

  • Traumatic Brain Injury

Brain
Nature Communications
PLOS ONE

Neurocognitive Disorder

  • Dementia
  • Frontotemporal Dementia
  • Vascular Cognitive Impairment

Neurodegenerative Disorder

Nature Communications

  • Alzheimer's Disease

Brain
eLife
Nature Communications
Translational Psychiatry

  • Ataxia
    • Cerebellar Ataxia
    • Friedreich’s Ataxia

Nature Communications

  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia

Molecular Brain
Nature Communications

  • Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

Brain

  • Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia
  • Huntington’s Disease

eLife
Jama
Nature Communications

  • Leigh Syndrome

eLife

  • Leukodsystrophy
  • Motor Neuron Disease
    • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

eLife

  • Kennedy’s Disease
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy

 

  • Multiple Sclerosis

Brain
JAMA Neurology
Nature Communications

  • Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses

Nature Communications

  • Niemann-Pick Type C
  • Parkinson's Disease

Brain
Nature Communications
PLOS ONE
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Peripheral Neuropathy

Brain
Nature Communications

Spina Bifida

  • Myelomeningocele

Journal of Child Neurology

Physical Disability

Amputation

eLife
Nature Communications

Amyloidosis

eLife
Nature Communications

Autoimmune Disease

  • Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis

American Journal of Pathology, The

  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

eLife

  • Systemic Sclerosis

Jama

Blindness

American Journal of Pathology, The

  • Choroideremia
  • Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

American Journal of Pathology, The

  • Glaucoma
  • Macular Degeneration

Nature Medicine
PLOS ONE

  • Macular Degeneration - Dry
  • Macular Degeneration - Wet
  • Macular Telangiectasia
  • Stargardt Disease

 

  • Retinitis Pigmentosa
  • Retinoschisis

Blood Disease

Nature Communications

  • Aplastic Anemia
  • Sickle Cell Disease

JAMA

Cardiovascular Disease

Nature Communications

  • Atherosclerosis

Nature Communications
PLOS ONE

  • Critical Limb Ischemia

JACC: Basic to Translational Science

  • Heart Disease

Nature Communications
Nature Materials

  • Thrombosis

JAMA

CHARGE Syndrome

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

PLOS ONE

Deafness

Diabetes

Advanced Materials
eLife
Nature Communications
PLOS ONE
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

  • Diabetic Cardiomyopathy
  • Diabetic Kidney Disease
  • Diabetic Neuropathy
  • Diabetic Retinopathy

American Journal of Pathology, The
Jama

  • MODY1 Diabetes

Journal of Biological Chemistry

  • Type 1 Diabetes

eLife
Nature Communications

  • Type 2 Diabetes

eLife
Nature Communications

Immunodeficiency Disorder

New England Journal of Medicine

  • Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
  • X Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

Inflammatory Disease

eLife
Nature Genetics

  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease

American Journal of Pathology, The
Nature Communications

  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis

Inflammatory Myopathies

  • Inclusion Body Myositis

Kidney Disease

  • Polycystic Kidney Disease

Journal of Biological Chemistry
Nature Communications

  • Renal Fibrosis

Liver Disease

American Journal of Pathology, The

  • Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
  • Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

Lung Disease

  • Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  • Cystic Fibrosis

PLOS ONE

  • Emphysema
  • Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Nature Communications

Metabolic Disease

  • Mucolipidosis Type IV
  • Phenylketonuria
  • Pompe Disease

Mitochondrial Disease

Muscular Dystrophy

eLife
Nature Communications

  • Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
  • Myotonic Dystrophy

Nature Communications

Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue

  • Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta
  • Scoliosis

Pancreatitis

  • Pancreatic Fibrosis

Usher Syndrome

Copyright

Traditionally, the author of an article was required to transfer the copyright to the journal publisher. Publishers claimed this was necessary in order to protect authors' rights, and to coordinate permissions for reprints or other use. However, many authors, especially those active in the open access movement, found this unsatisfactory, and have used their influence to effect a gradual move towards a license to publish instead. Under such a system, the publisher has permission to edit, print, and distribute the article commercially, but the authors retain the other rights themselves.

Even if they retain the copyright to an article, most journals allow certain rights to their authors. These rights usually include the ability to reuse parts of the paper in the author's future work, and allow the author to distribute a limited number of copies. Some publishers also grant the author the right to post and update the article on the author's or employer's website and on free e-print servers, to grant permission to others to use or reuse figures, and even to reprint the article as long as no fee is charged. The rise of open access journals, in which the author retains the copyright but must pay a publication charge is another recent response to copyright concerns.